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Council for The Advancement of the BSF
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The Council for the Advancement of the BSF is comprised of prominent Americans and Israelis from the arenas of science, academia and public service who are deeply committed to strengthening the bonds between the U.S. and Israel in general, and to the BSF mission of American-Israeli scientific cooperation, in particular.

The following are the current members of the Council: 


Prof. Sidney Altman, U.S.A.

Prof. Altman is Sterling Professor of Biology and Professor of Chemistry at Yale University. He won the 1989 Nobel Prize for Chemistry for his discoveries concerning RNA, described by the Nobel Academy as “one of the two most important and outstanding discoveries in the biological sciences in the past 40 years."

 



Prof. Aaron Ciechanover, Israel

Prof. Ciechanover is Distinguished Professor and Director of the Lorry I. Lokey Interdisciplinary Center for Life Sciences and Engineering at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology. He won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2004 for his discovery, with Avram Hershko Irwin Rose, of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. He is also the winner of the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research in 2000 and of the Israel Prize for Biological Research in 2003.



Prof. David Gross, U.S.A.

Prof. Gross is the incumbent of the Frederick W. Gluck Chair in Theoretical Physics and is Director of the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics of the University of California, Santa Barbara. He won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2004 for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction, thus solving the last great remaining problem in what is called the “Standard Model” of particle physics.



Prof. Avram Hershko, Israel

Prof. Hershko is Distinguished Professor of Biochemistry at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology. He won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2004 for his discovery, with Aaron Ciechanover and Irwin Rose, of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. He is also the winner of the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research in 2000, and of the Israel Prize for Biochemistry and Medicine in 1994.



Dr. Martin Indyk, U.S.A.

Dr. Indyk is the director of the Saban Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution. He is former assistant secretary of state for near east affairs, and served two terms as U.S. ambassador to Israel.




Prof. Roger Kornberg, U.S.A.

Prof. Kornberg is the Winzer Professor in Medicine in the Department of Structural Biology at Stanford University. He won the the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2006 for his studies of the process by which genetic information from DNA is copied to messenger-RNA ― the molecular basis of eukaryotic transcription.



Prof. Robert Langer,U.S.A.

Prof. Langer is Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a world renowned biomedical engineer, and one of history’s most prolific inventors in medicine. Prof. Langer has received over 160 major awards including the 2006 U.S. National Medal of Science; the Charles Stark Draper Prize, considered the equivalent of the Nobel Prize for engineers, and the 2008 Millennium Prize, the world’s largest technology prize. He is one of very few scientists elected to all three U.S. National Academies and the youngest in history (at age 43) to receive this distinction.



Prof. Itamar Rabinovich, Israel

Prof. Rabinovich is the incumbent of the Yona and Dina Ettinger Chair of Contemporary Middle Eastern History at Tel Aviv University. He is the former Israeli ambassador to the U.S. and president of Tel Aviv University. He currently serves as Deputy Chairman of the Institute for National Security Studies at Tel Aviv University, Chairman of the Dan David Foundation and member of the international advisory board of the Brookings Institution. He is also Global Distinguished Professor of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University.



Prof. Zehev Tadmor, Israel

Prof. Tadmor is former president of the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology and is currently Distinguished Professor and chairman of the Technion's Samuel Neaman Institute for Advanced Studies. A world renowned chemical engineer, Prof. Tadmor was awarded the Israeli Prime Ministers’ EMET Prize for Science in 2005.


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