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Hadassah, Ohio hospital eye health of preemies

Researchers from Hadassah Medical Organization (HMO) in Israel and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, have identified the reason why premature birth negatively affects kidney development and how to remedy it, according to a study published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal. This research describes how the creation of more nephrons (microscopic blood-filtering units inside the kidney) improves adult kidney function and identifies the protein hamartin, which needs to be manipulated for a longer period for proper kidney development. HMO’s Pediatric Nephrology Unit has  received a two-year grant from the U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation to continue its research with the Cincinnati Children’s team. The grant will enable the teams to pursue two new research directions: what medication can successfully manipulate the protein that controls kidney development, and what mechanism causes kidney problems in children born to malnourished mothers.     Read more...



Quantum fluctuations successfully imaged

International group of scientists, led by Prof. Beena Kalisky and Prof. Aviad Frydman, from the Department of Physics and the Institute for Nanotechnology at Bar-Ilan University in Israel, has succeeded in imaging quantum fluctuations for the first time. In their experiment, published recently in Nature Physics, not only were quantum fluctuations visualized, but new information about the sizes, times and distributions of quantum events was extracted. The researchers employed a unique microscope that can operate at very low temperatures to examine a material that undergoes a quantum phase transition.This experiment opens a door to detailed investigations of quantum events. This novel ability to look at quantum fluctuations is expected to be a fundamental tool for the future development of quantum technology. This study was funded by several grants, including the BSF (United States - Israel Binational Foundation) , which supported the cooperation of Prof. Frydman with his American colleague from Physics Department, The Ohio State University, Prof. Trivedi.     Read more...



Collaboration on Birth Outcomes and Changing Climate Receives International Award

How is pregnancy, a time of heightened susceptibility, impacted by increased temperatures and heat stress? A new BSF-funded "young scientists" collaborative project between New York's Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Israel's Ben-Gurion University of the Negev along with the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health is exploring the relationship between extreme temperatures and how they can adversely affect birth outcomes. Using satellite remote sensing and innovative exposure modeling, Allan Just, PhD, from the Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health (EMPH) at Mt. Sinai; Itai Kloog, PhD, from Ben Gurion University and Adjunct Professor in EMPH; and Joel Schwarz, PhD, from Harvard, will conduct an unprecedented bigdata study analyzing hundreds of thousands of births from two large population-based registries to better understand the links between climate and health.     Read more...



Seth Davidovits wins 2018 Marshall N. Rosenbluth dissertation award

Kudos to Dr. Seth Davidovits, a Princeton University graduate in the Department of Astrophysical Sciences, for winning the 2018 Marshall N. Rosenbluth dissertation award! A "remarkable achievement," his thesis was inspired by a BSF-NSF project originating at the Weizmann Institute of Science lab of Prof. Yitzhak Maron and will be "unusually influential" as a result of the productive collaboration with his Israeli counterpart. The experiments in Weizmann, in framework of the joint BSF-NSF project, raised theoretical questions brought to the attention of the collaborators at Princeton University. Motivated by these questions and by the experimental results achieved at the Weizmann lab of Prof. Maron, Dr. Davidovits started his theoretical work on this topic, which also led to additional partial theoretical collaboration with the Weizmann Institute.     Read more...



WITH MORE FUNDING, ISRAELI-US SCIENCE RESEARCH GROWS CLOSER

Israeli scientists are growing ever closer to their American peers, despite the geographic distance. In the next five years, the budget from the Israel Council for Higher Education for Israeli research collaborations with the U.S. is expected to jump by at least 60% with projects affiliated with the U.S.-Israel BSF-National Science Foundation (NSF)​ program receiving the lion's share of the increase. The BSF-NSF program, designed to combine the creative talents of American and Israeli scientists, was inaugurated in 2013 and is a show of support for Israeli researchers and institutions by the "world's research superpower." Specific areas of interest include: engineering, computer science, natural sciences, life sciences, earth sciences and social sciences. The NSF is accepting proposals from cooperating researchers from both countries.     Read more...



Bitcoin price manipulation puts trust in cryptocurrencies at risk

The impact of illicit cryptocurrency trading could be massive. A team of researchers from School of Economics, Tel-Aviv University and School of Computer Science, The University of Tulsa, have been researching digital currencies for the last several years. In their most recent paper, published in the Journal of Monetary Economics earlier this year, they found evidence of fraudulent behavior in 2013 and 2014, when prices soared and then tumbled over several months. The study is sponsored by a joint grant from the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF) Cyber Security program.     Read more...



Can Israeli scientists save Darwin’s finches?

“The problem with extinction is that it’s forever" and Darwin's iconic finches are at risk. The U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation - BSF along with the University of Minnesota, are supporting the work of internationally acclaimed entomologist Prof. Boaz Yuval and his colleagues Prof. Edouard Jurkevitch and Micki Ben-Yosef in a novel four-year project to save the finches from the fatal impact of the Galápagos' parasitic flies. The team will also collaborate with University of Minnesota entomologist George Heimpel and scientists from the Charles Darwin Foundation.     Read more...



Nanotube fibers in a jiffy

Short nanotube samples made by hand dramatically cut production time. Scientists from Rice University lab and the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology are making short carbon nanotube fibers by hand as a way to quickly test materials before spinning industrial quantities of fiber for aerospace, automotive, medical and smart-clothing applications.     Read more...



Our brains scan faces and tag them friend of foe, study shows

Researches from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel) and Princeton University (USA) now hope to see if they can change how the brain perceives people, and may be one day help suffers of autism, PTSD, depression. A new study, supported by a BSF grant, published in Nature Human Behavior journal describes how the unconscious mind processes human faces and the two types of faces it chooses to consciously see, namely: chose associated with dominance and threat and, to a lesser degree, with trustworthiness.     Read more...



Fueling the Future: Scientists from the United States and Israel promote new efficient method of algal hydrogen production

Prof. Kevin Redding's research group from the Center for Bioenergy and Photosynthesis, Arizona State University in a partnership with Prof. Iftach Yacoby - a young scientist from Tel-Aviv University, aim to change the way a nation generates and consumes energy, to obtain industrial scale algal hydrogen production. The project is sponsored by a joint grant from the NSF and the BSF.     Read more...



Scientists find new method to control electronic properties of nanocrystals

Researchers from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Stony Brook University, and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have discovered new effects of an important method for modulating semiconductors. The method, which works by creating open spaces or "vacancies" in a material's structure, enables scientists to tune the electronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals (SCNCs)—semiconductor particles that are smaller than 100 nanometers. This finding will advance the development of new technologies like smart windows, which can change opaqueness on demand.     Read more...



Israel to build its first ‘dark matter’ detector

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev will attempt to shed light on the hypothetical type of cosmic matter. International team of experts in the fields of atomic spectroscopy, magnetic sensors, lasers and optics, atomic clocks and advanced electronics will cooperate on the effort, which will be led by BGU Prof. Ron Folman with Prof. Derek Jackson Kimball of California State University, East Bay. The initiative is partly funded by a joint grant from the American National Science Foundation (NSF) and the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF).     Read more...



Graphene Deemed a Highly Effective Antifouling Material

Binational team of Israeli and American researchers discovers that laser-induced graphene zaps bacteria. Scientists at Houston-based Rice University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) have discovered that laser-induced graphene (LIG) is a highly effective antifouling material, and when electrified, a bacteria zapper. In their report in the American Chemical Society’s ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, the researchers note that LIG also protects surfaces from biofouling, the buildup of microorganisms, plants or other biological material on wet surfaces.     Read more...



Swirling a Fluid from Within

Scientists from Tel-Aviv University (Israel) and University of Chicago (United States) provide a new insight on how to control chaotic swirling motion in a fluid. A new study sponsored by a BSF grant finds the sedimentation of asymmetric objects in liquid is very different from that of symmetrical objects like spheres. A new theory suggests that sedimenting particles of irregular shape will drift horizontally as they fall, a result that may resolve a long-standing puzzle. The research explains process of sedimentation in natural and industrial contexts.     Read more...



Earth’s Mysterious Magnetic Field, Stored in a Jar

Ancient pottery can record our planet's magnetic ebb and flow. Six centuries of geomagnetic intensity variations recorded by royal Judean stamped jar handles. In the study published in PNAS and supported by a BSF research grant, binational team of Israeli and American archeologists and geophysicists reports the most detailed reconstruction yet of the magnetic field in pre-instrumental times, using a set of ceramic jars from Iron Age Judea, that were made between 750 and 150 B.C. The team’s analysis suggests that for much of that time the magnetic field was relatively stable, and about forty per cent stronger than it is now. But the oldest jars reveal that, just before 700 B.C., the field’s strength briefly jumped by half, to almost twice its modern intensity, then fell rapidly in the next three decades. Today, such an event would cause catastrophic disruption of the electrical grid and satellite communications. It’s unlikely that the Judeans even noticed it. The new findings, with their clear evidence of a geomagnetic spike, may help archeologists date pottery from other Iron Age sites, particularly where stamps are lacking.     Read more...



Come on baby, (re)light my fire

Many couples find that their sexual desire has dwindled over time. It's not unusual for partners who could not keep their hands off each to gradually lose interest. But new psychological research, supported by the BSF, indicates that there are ways that couples can sustain--or relight--their passion.     Read more...



Director-General Irina Bokova celebrates science diplomacy at the United States-Israel Binational Science Foundation annual event

10 February 2015 – “The US-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF) bears witness to the power of science diplomacy to bring people together, to strengthen the foundations of peace and this resonates at the heart of UNESCO’s mandate” declared the Director-General Irina Bokova at the annual dinner of the BSF, held at the Israeli Embassy in Washington D.C.     Read more...



Researchers sequence genomes of parasite that is actually a 'micro jellyfish'

A very exciting finding emanated from an NSF-BSF ICOB program, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. It’s a shocking discovery that may redefine how scientists interpret what it means to be an animal. The scientists will reveal how a jellyfish — those commonplace sea pests with stinging tentacles — have evolved over time into “really weird” microscopic organisms, made of only a few cells, that live inside other animals.     Read more...



Bees to scientists: 'We're more complicated than you think'

Chemical signaling among social insects, such as bees, ants and wasps, is more complex than previously thought, according to researchers at Penn State and Tel Aviv University, whose results refute the idea that a single group of chemicals controls reproduction across numerous species.     Read more...



New Study Raises Questions about Training by Repetition for Those with Autism

A recent study, by US-Israel binational team of neuroscientists, shows that training individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to acquire new information by repeating the information may harm their ability to apply that learned knowledge to other situations. This finding, published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, challenges the popular educational approaches designed for ASD individuals that focus on repetition and drills. It has been thought that because those with ASD sometimes acquire a new behavior or skill only in a specific context, and have difficulty transferring that learned skill or information to a new context, repetition can aid the learning process.     Read more...



The Tidings of Scientific Collaboration with the United States (in Hebrew)

The Israeli Academy of Science, in its recent Report to the Israeli Government, emphasized the acute need at this time for scientific collaboration with the US. Strengthening connections with their U.S colleagues is one of the essential requirements of the Israeli scientific community. A new model of binational scientific cooperation with the NSF (U.S. National Science Foundation) will greatly contribute to this significant purpose.     Read more...



Heartbeat is complex, synchronized event, find Weizmann Institute and Penn Scientists

Two hearts, said Keats, can beat as one, but a study led by Weizmann Institute scientists in collaboration with researchers from the University of Pennsylvania shows that sometimes a single heart muscle cell can beat as more than two dozen. The findings, reported recently in Nature Communications, provide an extremely detailed glimpse into the mechanisms behind normal and irregular heart muscle cell contractions. The study may help define the limitations of existing therapies for abnormal heartbeat and, in the future, suggest ways of designing new ones.     Read more...



New look at neuroscience draws experts to ASU

As part of an effort by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and National Institutes of Health (NIH) to leverage this investment of time and money, and to provide opportunities for neuroscientists to collaborate, Arizona State University's School of Life Sciences and School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences are hosting the 2014 Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience (CRCNS) meeting for principal investigators. Scheduled Oct.16-18, this annual conference brings together scientists from many disciplines to investigate how the brain works at all levels, from molecular to behavior to networks of neurons. Through the CRCNS program, the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, the French National Research Agency, and the United States-Israel Binational Science Foundation support collaborative activities that will advance the understanding of nervous system structure and function, mechanisms underlying nervous system disorders, and computational strategies used by the nervous system.     Read more...



Researchers explore what happens when heart cells fail

Through a grant from the United States-Israel Binational Science Foundation, Biomedical Engineering Associate Professor Naomi Chesler will embark upon a new collaborative research project to better understand heart function and failure. "This is unique opportunity to combine theoretical and the experimental approaches and to develop a collaboration with an Israeli investigator," Chesler says. Chesler will work with Richard Moss, the UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health associate dean for basic research, biotechnology and graduate studies; and with Amir Landesberg, dean of biomedical engineering at Technion-Israel Institute of Technology.     Read more...



Celebrating the BSF

In January 2014, amid freezing cold temperatures, the U.S. – Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF) celebrated its current successes and awarded Vanderbilt Professor Janet Macdonald, the Bergmann Memorial Award Held at the Israeli Embassy in Washington DC, guests enjoyed a wonderful buffet and a musical performance by the Silverwinds Ensemble. BSF Board members, grantees, and friends from the Washington government and science community mingled with members of the American Friends of the U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation (AFBSF) board.     Read more...



TAU researchers find way to slow down white blood cells

Tel Aviv researchers have found a way to put the brakes on white blood cells and prevent them from going wild and overactive, a condition that can lead to allergies and autoimmune diseases.
The research has just been published online in the Nature Immunology journal and was funded by the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation, the Israel Science Foundation, the Israel Cancer Research Fund and the Fritz Thyssen Foundation.     Read more...



Occupational disease that threatens dental technicians (in Hebrew)

Israeli dental technicians are in risk of Chronic Beryllium Disease, the illness that may impair the lung function. Regular diagnosis tests for target population at high-risk has not been implemented yet. BSF supported joint longitudinal follow-up study in environmental occupational health to investigate Israeli dental technicians and Nuclear Industry workers in USA.     Read more...



U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation Funds 40 Nobel Prize Winners in 40 years

As the Nobel Committee announced its selections this past fall, two additional scientists who previously participated together with Israeli colleagues in research programs supported by the United States-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF) have been honored. “The BSF has now supported research involving a total of 40 Nobel Laureates in our organization’s 40 years,” said Professor Mina Teicher, Chair of the BSF Board of Governors. “Our peer review panels work diligently to identify the best scientists. Our track record speaks for itself.” The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded jointly to Serge Haroche and David J. Wineland “for ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems.” David Wineland is a physicist at the U.S. Department of Commerce National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In 2004, along with Prof. Amit Ben-Kish from the Technion and Prof. Ron Folman from the Ben-Gurion University, Wineland received funding from the BSF.     Read more...



US-Israel look to Neurotechnology cooperation

The United States-Israel Science and Technology Foundation (USISTF), the Israel – U.S. Binational Industrial Research and Development Foundation (BIRD), and the U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF) announced today the plenary session speakers and program agenda for the 2012 U.S.-Israel Neurotechnology and Neuroscience Conference. The conference will bring together leading scientists from academia and industry to highlight recent developments in the study of brain function and brain disorders. The event is scheduled for September 12 at the National Academy of Sciences Building in Washington, D.C. The 2012 U.S.-Israel Neurotechnology and Neuroscience Conference will feature leading experts in the field of neurology, who will share recent breakthroughs in the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders and how bi-national cooperation plays a key role in advancing brain research.     Read more...



Physicists invent ‘spintronic’ LED

University of Utah physicists invented a new "spintronic" organic light-emitting diode or OLED that promises to be brighter, cheaper and more environmentally friendly than the kinds of LEDs now used in television and computer displays, lighting, traffic lights and numerous electronic devices. "It's a completely different technology," says Z. Valy Vardeny, University of Utah distinguished professor of physics and senior author of a study of the new OLEDs in the July 13, 2012 issue of the journal Science. Vardeny developed the new kind of LED with Tho D. Nguyen, a research assistant professor of physics and first author of the study, and Eitan Ehrenfreund, a physicist at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa.     Read more...



Plant poison turns seed-eating mouse into seed spitter

In Israel's Negev Desert, a plant called sweet mignonette or taily weed uses a toxic "mustard oil bomb" to make the spiny mouse spit out the plant's seeds when eating the fruit. Thus, the plant has turned a seed-eating rodent into a seed spreader that helps the plant reproduce, says a new study by Utah and Israeli scientists. "It adds a new dimension to our understanding of the ongoing battle between plants and animals," says Denise Dearing, a coauthor of the study and professor of biology at the University of Utah. "In this case, the plants have twisted the animals to do their bidding, to spread their progeny." The study illustrates the first known case within a single species of what is known as the "directed deterrence" hypothesis, namely, "the fruit is trying have itself eaten by the right consumer -- one that will spread its seeds”.     Read more...



What do pendulums and elastic film share?

A coupled line of swinging pendulums apparently has nothing in common with an elastic film that buckles and folds under compression while floating on a liquid, but scientists at the University of Chicago and Tel-Aviv University have discovered a deep connection between the two phenomena. Energy carried in ordinary waves, like those seen on the ocean near a beach, quickly disperses. But the energy in the coupled pendulums and in compressed elastic film concentrates into different kinds of waves, ones with discrete packets of energy called “solutions”.     Read more...



Hebrew University and University of Kentucky Research Teams win Israel-US Science Award in New Program on Transformative Science

A recent press release from joint research teams at the University of Kentucky in the United States and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel touts their accomplishment in winning a highly-regarded award from the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF) for a new program focused on transformative science. This work by researchers at the University of Kentucky and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem could help to explain how the information contained within genomes are used to build a living organism. The exciting new window into genomes might allow research scientists to design completely new treatments in the fight against many human diseases and continued investigation could lead to a whole new understanding of molecular biology.     Read more...



Smooth single-molecule layers of materials: Expanding the degrees of surface freezing

As part of the quest to form perfectly smooth single-molecule layers of materials for advanced energy, electronic, and medical devices, researchers have discovered that the molecules in thin films remain frozen at a temperature where the bulk material is molten. Thin molecular films have a range of applications extending from organic solar cells to biosensors, and understanding the fundamental aspects of these films could lead to improved devices. The study, which appears in the April 1, 2011, edition of Physical Review Letters (online at: link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.137801), is the first to directly observe "surface freezing" at the buried interface between bulk liquids and solid surfaces. The results of this study and the theoretical framework which it provides may lead to new ideas on how to make defect-free, single molecule-thick films.     Read more...



It looks like a pen but it can foil a bomb

A new weapon in the arsenal shared by airport security personnel and police resembles a pen but can detect bomb detonators in powder form at as little as five micrograms. Collaboration between an American researcher and Prof. Ehud Keinan of the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology has culminated in a new way to foil terrorists carrying TATP-based explosives. Resembling a pen – although you can’t write with it – the device is a new weapon in the arsenal shared by airport security personnel, police and environmentalists. Keinan and Prof. Philip Dawson from the Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California, recently developed and commercialized the ACRO-P.E.T. (Peroxide Explosives Tester) – a simple and cost-effective device for detecting TATP.     Read more...



A fountain of youth in your muscles?- Researchers uncover muscle-stem cell mechanism in aging

Researchers have discovered how endurance exercise, like jogging or spinning classes, increases the number of muscle stem cells, enhancing their ability to rejuvenate old muscles. The finding could lead to a new drug to heal muscles faster. Prof. Dafna Benayahu and her team at Tel Aviv University's Sackler School of Medicine say their findings explain for the first time why older people who have exercised throughout their lives age more gracefully. They have discovered how endurance exercise increases the number of muscle stem cells and enhances their ability to rejuvenate old muscles.
The researchers hope their finding can lead to a new drug to help the elderly and immobilized heal their muscles faster.     Read more...



Artificial light at night may cause obesity

Obesity is not necessarily related to the amount of food eaten or to physical activity, but rather to when you eat, according to a new study at Ohio State University in collaboration with Prof. Abraham Haim of the University of Haifa. Timing appears to be the key, with the discovery that exposure to artificial Light at Night (LAN) could cause obesity.     Read more...



Planned research into Lou Gehrig's disease could let patients bank own stem cells for treatment

Those afflicted with the deadly, degenerative neurological condition called Lou Gehrig’s disease could eventually bank their own stem cells for later treatment. That's the hope driving new research funded by billionaire mall mogul and Pontiac native Alfred Taubman. This week, Taubman announced a new collaboration between University of Michigan neurologist Dr. Eva Feldman, the director of the A. Alfred Taubman Medical Research Institute within the U-M Medical School, and Israeli doctor Benjamin Reubinoff of the Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem. Taubman and a grant from the United States-Israel Binational Science Foundation are funding the new collaboration     Read more...



Oxytocin: it’s a mom and pop thing

A fascinating new paper “Oxytocin and the Development of Parenting in Humans” by Ilanit Gordon and colleagues reports the first longitudinal data on oxytocin levels during the initiation of parenting in humans. They evaluated 160 first-time parents (80 couples) twice after the birth of their first child, at 6 weeks and 6 months, by measuring each parents’ oxytocin levels and monitoring and coding their parenting behavior. Corresponding author Dr. Ruth Feldman noted that this finding “emphasizes the importance of providing opportunities for father-infant interactions immediately after childbirth in order to trigger the neuro-hormonal system that underlies bond formation in humans.”     Read more...



New Israeli battery provides thousands of hours of power

A new kind of portable electrochemical battery that can produce thousands of hours of power - and soon replace the expensive regular or rechargeable batteries in hearing aids and sensors and eventually in cellphones, laptop computers and even electric cars - has been developed at Haifa's Technion - Israel Institute of Technology. The unique battery is based on silicon as a fuel that reverts to its original sand. The battery can also be left on the shelf for years and inserted into a device to provide immediate power. It was developed over the last two-and-a-half years by Prof. Yair Ein-Eli of the Technion's materials engineering department, with collaboration by Prof. Digby Macdonald of Pennsylvania State University in the US and Prof. Rika Hagiwara of Kyoto University in Japan. The work was conducted with a grant from the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation, and an article on the battery was just published in the journal Electrochemistry Communications.     Read more...



Antibiotics that outwit bacteria

Researchers team from the University of Michigan's Life Sciences Institute and the University of Tel Aviv have figured out a way to fool bacteria by using the microbes’ own defenses against them, techniques that could provide scientists with a new tool in the fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Resistance is a problem in the aminoglycoside family of antibiotics, which are commonly used to fight serious bacterial infections and genetic diseases, and as anti-HIV drugs.     Read more...



Drugs may prevent epilepsy & seizures after brain injury

Drugs that block a growth factor receptor on brain cells may prevent epilepsy after brain damage, according to a new study appearing in the July 15 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. Daniela Kaufer, an assistant professor of integrative biology at the University of California, Berkeley, graduate student Luisa P. Cacheaux, and their Israeli colleagues, graduate student Yaron David and neurosurgeon Alon Friedman, found that they could prevent the brain changes leading to epilepsy in rats by treating the animals with a drug that blocks transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) receptors     Read more...



Social network bolsters teen emotions after suicide bombings

Teenagers who have a strong social support system are more resilient to depression after being exposed indirectly to suicide bombings than those who had little social support from friends before the incident. This was discovered by Prof. Golan Shahar of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev's psychology department in Beersheba, working together with Dr. Christopher Henrich from Georgia State University. The BGU psychologist said that the study - funded by the Israel-USA Binational Science Foundation - "serves as a basis for the development of innovative preventive interventions for adolescents exposed to terror attacks."     Read more...



Sheba, NYU researchers to draw genetic map of wandering Jew

Geneticists at Sheba Medical Center and New York University have launched the world's first comprehensive gene-mapping project of the Jewish people, in an effort to trace their wanderings to and from Israel and in the Diaspora over the millennia. The research may also be used in the future to connect specific genes to certain "Jewish diseases" by providing data on the normal gene to serve as a control group. The project is being carried out by Prof. Eitan Friedman of Sheba's clinical genetics unit and Prof. Harry Ostrer, director of the human genetics program at NYU Medical School's pediatrics department, who is an expert in the origins of the Jewish people. The 18-month to two-year project is being funded by the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation.     Read more...



New radiation-free therapy detects and eliminates breast cancer tumors in mice

A BSF-sponsored team of American and Israeli scientists has developed a targeted cancer therapy that is able to detect and eliminate tumors in mice with seemingly fewer side effects than other breast-cancer treatments.     Read more...



Genetic Mechanism in Mole Rats Can be Targeted in Cancer Research

Cellular mechanisms that subterranean mole rats have developed in order to survive the low levels of oxygen in their underground habitat are similar to the mechanisms used by tumors to survive and progress in humans. This landmark discovery was revealed in a new study by researchers from the University of Haifa and the University of Illinois, supported by a BSF grant.     Read more...



U.S. and Israel Agree to Cooperate on Renewable Energy

The United States and Israel have signed an agreement of cooperation promoting joint research and development projects in renewable energy, and the BSF will play a key role.     Read more...



Scientists Reveal Mechanism for Healthy Nerve Development

BSF-supported research led by Prof. Elior Peles of the Weizmann Institute of Science and Prof. Steven Scherer of the University of Pennsylvania, published in Nature Neuroscience, may lead to new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases and in restoring the normal function of affected nerve fibers.     Read more...



Inexpensive 'Nanoglue' Can Bond Nearly Anything Together

A newly-developed ‘nanoglue’ can bond materials that don’t normally stick together. This research, supported in part by the BSF, by Prof. Ganapathiraman Ramanath of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Prof. Moshe Eizenberg of the Technion, could have major benefits for everything from computer chips to energy production.     Read more...



BSF workshops promote cooperation between Israelis and Palestinians

The BSF's workshop program promotes scientific cooperation between Israeli, Palestinian and American scientists, in subjects of regional interest and importance, such as water, environment and public health.     Read more...



Israeli and U.S. Scientists Reverse Brain Birth Defects using Stem Cells

A team of researchers has succeeded in reversing brain birth defects in animal models with the use of embryonic stem cells. This BSF-supported collaboration between Prof. Joseph Yanai of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and Prof. Ted Slotkin of Duke University could lead to a major breakthrough in the treatment of neural and behavioral birth defects.     Read more...



How Memories are Made, and Recalled

What makes a memory? For the first time, scientists at UCLA and the Weizmann Institute of Science have recorded individual brain cells in the act of calling up a memory, thus revealing where in the brain a specific memory is stored, and how it is able to recreate it. (originally reported in the journal Science).     Read more...



Protons Partner With Neutrons More Often Than With Other Protons

Fast-moving protons are much more likely to pair up with fast-moving neutrons than with other protons in the nuclei of atoms, according to a recent experiment. The research confirms a previous theoretical prediction by a Penn State physicist. The theory and its experimental confirmation show that the high-energy interactions can be used to make future discoveries in order to understand the structure of nuclear systems, from light nuclei to massive neutron stars. Two decades ago, Strikman and his collaborator Leonid Frankfurt of Tel Aviv University in Israel suggested that the most direct way to look for pairings of two high-momentum nucleons--a nucleon is a proton or a neutron in the nucleus of an atom--would be to knock a fast-moving nucleon out of an atom's nucleus and to identify the nucleon that is left behind. In 2006, Strikman and his colleagues published a paper in the journal Physical Review Letters in which they described the development and results of a detailed model that analyzed the Brookhaven National Laboratory data. The discovery is the most clear-cut example that the high-energy processes, which we have been advocating for many years, are truly effective tools and can be used for future discoveries.     Read more...



Protons Pair Up With Neutrons: U.S.-Israeli Research Sheds New Light on Structure of Nuclear Systems

Research performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility could have implications for understanding the structure of nuclear systems. This research was performed by Jefferson Lab’s Prof. Douglas Higinbotham, Tel Aviv University’s Prof. Eli Piasetzky, and others, in a multinational collaboration supported by the BSF.     Read more...



Alzheimer's Protection? Appealing the Death Sentence for Brain Cells

A new drug being developed by Prof. Ilana Gozes of Tel Aviv University may be an effective treatment against Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other diseases. This promising development grew out of BSF-supported collaboration between Prof. Gozes and Dr. Doug Brenneman from the U.S. National Institutes of Health.     Read more...



BSF Profile: Harnessing Binational Brainpower

For over 30 years the BSF has played a crucial role in facilitating U.S.-Israel scientific relations, bringing together the best minds of the two countries. Working behind the scenes, the BSF makes a powerful contribution to science, technology and economic growth - and to strengthening the bonds of friendship between Israel and America.     Read more...



The Rhythm According to Green: Research Profile of BSF Grantee Dr. Rachel Green

Research into the biological processes of plants can help breeders better select which plants to grow in different climates, which in turn will lead to increased crop yield. This research, being carried out in a BSF-supported project by Dr. Rachel Green of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and Prof. Robertson McClung of Dartmouth College, may have applications for human medicine as well, as the ‘biological clocks’ of plants and animals work the same way.     Read more...



Optical Fibers Help NASA Locate Livable Planets in the Universe

The development of a special optical fiber is helping NASA get closer to answering the age-old question: ‘Is there life on other planets’? This fiber was developed by Prof. Abraham Katzir of Tel Aviv University and Prof. Amnon Yariv of the California Institute of Technology in a BSF-supported collaboration, and could be installed in space satellites as early as 2012.     Read more...



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